Term Limits

TERM LIMITS

When the United States was formed and the Constitution written and adopted the elected positions of government, President, Senator, and Representative, were viewed as part-time, short term roles performed by citizen-leaders who generally had other jobs and responsibilities. However over time they have become full time positions and, unfortunately, they now require a large time comment to the pursuit of getting reelected, allowing less time for focus on representation and good governance. Term limits are envisioned as a compromise that recognizes that the business of government is very complicated and requires some learning curve period, but also puts a limit on getting too comfortable and tied in with the structure.  The maximum period of twelve years is recommended for both the role of Representative and for Senator.

The position of President of the United States is a massive responsibility and it is expected (hoped) that a person elected to it will come with appropriate preparation either in government or business and will require less adjustment.

Recent history has shown that two terms as President has not proven to be a good plan for the role.  He or she will come into the office with the majority of Americans excited and in support. New plans and approaches take off.  But, then life comes along.  Recent Presidents have found themselves working on the next election way too soon and too inclined to sell out to big money and strong power brokers. The President needs the time and the freedom to lead this country in the direction that the voters expected when he or she was elected.  Six years without the worry of reelection or raising money should provide that time and freedom.

It is time to return the leadership of The United States of America to empathic leaders that are not operating in their own self-interest but truly desire what is best for the country and its people.

 

Proposed Constitutional Amendments to Create Term Limits

The detailed proposal, outlined below, would establish a system of term limits for the positions of Representative, Senator and President. With some exceptions for possible unusual circumstances, Representatives would hold that office for a maximum of 12 years, a Senator would hold that office for a maximum of 12 years and a President for a single term of 6 years. There are no restrictions in the system to prevent an individual from holding all three offices in some order for a total of 30 years.

 

Article. I.

Section. 1.

All legislative Powers herein granted shall be vested in a Congress of the United States, which shall consist of a Senate and House of Representatives.

Section. 2.

The House of Representatives shall be composed of Members chosen every second Year by the People of the several States, and the Electors in each State shall have the Qualifications requisite for Electors of the most numerous Branch of the State Legislature.

No Person shall be a Representative who shall not have attained to the Age of twenty five Years, and been seven Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State in which he shall be chosen. No person shall be elected as a Member of The House of Representatives more than six consecutive times from the same State.

Section. 3.

Note: Article I, section 3, of the Constitution was modified by the 17th amendment.

The Senate of the United States shall be composed of two Senators from each State,  elected by the people  thereof, for six Years; and each Senator shall have one Vote.

Immediately after they shall be assembled in Consequence of the first Election, they shall be divided as equally as may be into three Classes. The Seats of the Senators of the first Class shall be vacated at the Expiration of the second Year, of the second Class at the Expiration of the fourth Year, and of the third Class at the Expiration of the sixth Year, so that one third may be chosen every second Year;  No Person shall be a Senator who shall not have attained to the Age of thirty Years, and been nine Years a Citizen of the United States, and who shall not, when elected, be an Inhabitant of that State for which he shall be chosen. No person shall be elected as a Senator  more than two consecutive times from the same State.

 

Article. II.

Section. 1.

The executive Power shall be vested in a President of the United States of America. He shall hold his Office during the Term of four six Years, and, together with the Vice President, chosen for the same Term, be elected, as follows…

 

 AMENDMENT XXII

Passed by Congress March 21, 1947. Ratified February 27, 1951.

Section 1.
No person shall be elected to the office of the President more than twiceonce, and no person who has held the office of President, or acted as President, for more than two   four   years of a term to which some other person was elected President shall be elected to the office of the President.  more than once.

 

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